Buying Beads Jewellery with Swarovski Elements

First of all, what’s the big interest in Swarovski? They are man-made crystal gems that have been manufactured in Austria for hundreds of years.

It was in 1892 that Daniel Swarovski (formerly Swartz), son of a Bohemian glass cutter, a glass-cutting expert invested a revolutionary machine. This was the electric cutting machine. It relied on hydro-electricity, sand, and minerals, to produce crystal glass. This machine allows the crystals to be cut with more precision than it could be achieved by hand. The company is still owned by the family, in its fifth generation, and employs over 25,000 employs.

The exact proportion of materials that the company uses in the machine remains a secret to this day. It was this manufacturing process that ensures a degree of precision so perfect that it produces the most stunning and brilliant crystals. Swarovski has continued this tradition, and continues to produce the world’s most recognised crystals from their Austrian factory, located in Wattens.

The business is two-fold. On the one hand, they produce and sell loose elements to those within the jewellery industry; on the other hand, they create precision cut crystal that is used in jewellery, home décor, and figurines.

Swarovski took things to the next level with Christian Dior in 1956. They developed the effect known as the Aurora Borealis. This provided the crystals with a sparkling rainbow sparkle. It was in 1977 that the company released its own jewellery collection, which included watches. The crystals are used by fashion’s top designers, including Louis Vuitton, Dolce & Gobbana, and Chanel. They use crystal mesh fabric, as well as actual crystals, to adorn their stunning fashion creations.

Then, in 1995, Swarovski opened an Austrian museum to showcase their extensive collection. The brand is also known for the 550 pound, 9-foot star that has topped New York City’s famous Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, for over a decade.

What Are Swarovski Elements?

This is the brand name that is used for the loose crystals that are using in making jewellery, fashion pieces, and accessories. Genuine crystals are used in the products that are designed and made by manufacturers. When you see a label, reading Made with Swarovski Elements, this certifies that authentic Swarovski crystals were used to create the piece.
Swarovski crystals are more expensive than glass, but why? It’s due to the production methods, as well as the raw resources used in processing. This impacts the quality of the finished item. Swarovski relies on the finest materials to create the crystals that are known the world over for their value and brilliance. Swarovski crystals uses superior materials, cutting, production, and polishing. This is what sets Swarovski apart from the competition, and increases the value of the product.

The process that Swarovski uses is complex. To create a product that has identical facets in every direction is complicated. A computer calculates every direction of reflected light, then this is stimulated in 3D, it is then optimised and converted into the machines control program.
Swarovski also have a silver crystal line. This was created by one of the craftsman, as he manged to capture this silvery shine in the crystals facets. The Swarovski Silver line is made using a combination of quart sand and natural minerals. The crystals are cooled slowly, allowing them to avoid imperfections and stress. These crystals have a spectral brilliance which creates a unique silver colouring, thus the impression that they’re made from a genuine precious metal.
How Can They Be Used in Jewellery?

They can be used in every aspect of making jewellery. Collections are introduced every season and they often include Swarovski crystals. Whether the piece is all crystal, or the crystals are used in combination with metals, and gems, whether semi-precious or precious. Swarovski has an extensive line of jewellery, for women and for men. You can choose from watches, necklaces, earrings, pins, rings, and bracelets.

I offer a wide variety of options which touch every design and style possible.
How to Care for Swarovski Crystal?

Once you’ve made your purchase, you should know that it should be treated in the same manner as you would your finest jewellery. You should be careful about exposing the piece to water and chemicals. Additionally, you should be careful of wearing the piece while working or playing sports. You should never go swimming while wearing Swarovski crystals.

To clean or polish your Swarovski jewellery piece simply use a soft cloth, mild soap, and water. Where possible, your Swarovski jewellery piece should be stored in the original packing. If this is not available, then store it carefully in a soft cloth or tissue paper to protect the crystals from loosening, and prevent the metal from being scratches.

How Do You Know It’s Real Swarovski?

There are multiple ways to determine whether your Swarovski is an imitation, or real. While some of these factors are determined simply by looking at the packaging and the crystals, others will need to be examined through a jeweller’s glass to inspect the fine details.
• Real Swarovski don’t have bubbles within the crystal.
• Each facet meets and points upwards.
• They have a brilliant shine.
• When sold as beads, they are sold as loose stones. They are never stringed together, with the exception of Swarovski pearls.
• Every crystal is the same size, as they are cut using a machine.
• When there is an oily sheen or surface scratches- these are clear signs of an imitation.
• When the crystal is from the same colour, they will be all be identical.
• When you purchase Swarovski crystals or jewellery, it should be from an authorised retailer like ourselves. This will ensure you are buying an authentic Swarovski, and we provide your product in a Swarovski box.

Every genuine Swarovski product since 1989 has featured the authentic logo. Between 1976 and 1988 the logo was simply a square C, featuring an S inside. The logo that is used now, and has been since 1989, is a swan.

By |2017-09-27T22:30:07+00:00July 30th, 2017|Beaded info|0 Comments

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